All flour comparison and usage

One of the main ingredients in many of our favourite cakes and cookies, flour is something you will almost always have stock of if you are a frequent baker. After all, it’s easier to buy them in bulk. Learn about the several different kinds of flours you use to achieve the best results for your desserts!

All-purpose flour

DESCRIPTION

  1. Carrot cake
  2. Butter cake

All-purpose flour is one of the most commonly used types of flour. This flour is made from a blend of hard and soft wheat. That gives it a middle-of-the-road protein and starch content. All-purpose has a 10% to 12% protein content.

Bread flour

DESCRIPTION

  1. White sandwich bread
  2. French bread

Bread flour is made entirely from hard wheat. The larger amount of gluten generated by this higher protein flour helps bread rise higher. That’s because the gluten traps and holds air bubbles as you mix and knead the dough. bread flour is the best choice for yeasted baking products. Bread flour has more, at about 14% to 16% protein content.

Cake flour

DESCRIPTION

  • Vanilla cupcakes
  • Devils food chocolate cake

Cake flour is a low protein flour and it contains about 7-9% protein. When used in cakes, it results in a super-tender texture with a fine crumb, and a good rise.

Pastry flour

DESCRIPTION

  1. Nutella tarts
  2. Apple pie

Pastry flour is made from soft wheat, which makes it finer than all-purpose flour. Its protein content places it between all-purpose and cake flours. This flour is ideal for tart crusts, pie dough, muffins, and
some cookie batters. lf you’re trying to achieve a “tender but crumbly pastry” this one is the best!

Self Raising flour

DESCRIPTION

  • Chocolate sponge cake
  • Brownies

When you’re looking for a shortcut, self-rising flour already has a leavening agent (baking powder) and salt built right in. The flour base is closer to a cake flour with lower protein. It cannot be substituted for
other flours. To make your own self-rising flour combine 1 cup of flour with 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder and 1/2 teaspoon of salt.

Almond flour

DESCRIPTION

  • Macarons

Almond flour is made by blanching almonds in boiling water to remove the skins, then grinding and sifting them into a fine flour. This gluten-free favorite is low in carbs and high in healthy fats and fiber.

Whole Wheat Flour

DESCRIPTION

  • Whole wheat bread
  • Whole wheat apple cinnamon muffins

Made by grinding whole wheat, and it does not filter out bran. Rich in vitamins BI, B2, B3 and B6 and other minerals, its nutritional values is very high.

Gluten Free Flour

DESCRIPTION

  • Gluten free chocolate cake
  • Gluten free cookies

The protein content is even lower than the low protein flour, specializing in providing factory-produced products with special formulas or special health foods.

Semolina Flour

DESCRIPTION

  • Angel hair pasta
  • Fettuccine pasta

Semolina, also known as pasta wheat or macaroni wheat, is a type of flour that is typically made from hard durum wheat. It has a rather coarse texture and is high in gluten protein. This makes it especially well suited to pasta, since it makes less sticky dough than other flours, and is much more elastic.

Corn Flour

DESCRIPTION

  • Pavlova
  • Meringue kisses

Cornstarch or maize starch is the starch derived from corn grain. The starch is obtained from the endosperm Of the kernel. Corn starch is a common food ingredient, Often used to thicken sauces or soups, and to make corn syrup and other sugars.

Tapioca Flour

DESCRIPTION

  • Pear/Boba
  • Taro ball

It is starch extracted from the root of cassava. It will be transparent when cooked with water and heat, and the mouthfeel is chewy and elastic. Tapioca flour can be used to make taro balls, pearls, put cahi ko, and bika ambon.

Superfine Flour

DESCRIPTION

  • Chocolate chip cookies
  • Mille crepe

This types of flour can make a finer cake texture, it is easy to sift, and it can also be called low-gluten flour. It is best used to make delicate soft cakes, crepe, donuts, cookies, etc.

Congratulations. You now know a bit better about flours!

Did you love this information?

We hope this useful information will be helpful in your baking journey.

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